McGroarty Arts Center 14th Annual Chili Bowl Fest and Art & Craft Faire

McGroarty Arts & Chili Bowl Fest

McGroarty Arts Center
7570 McGroarty Terrace
Tujunga, CA 91042

Saturday, December 3, 2016
10AM-5PM
On Saturday, along with the Holiday Boutique, we have our famous
Chili Bowl Sale with Homemade Chili!
Shoppers can pick out a ceramic bowl handcrafted by the artists in our
Ceramics Department and fill it with home-made chili while enjoying
Live Music, Craft Beer, and Baked Goods!
35 Artisan Vendors

Sunday, December 4, 2016

10AM-4PM
Homemade Soups and Stews, Live Christmas Music,

Craft Beer, Santa, and Cookie Painting!
35 Artisan Vendors

 
Saturday and Sunday 
Bill's Bees 
Buzz by, Say Hi!

Bill's wife, Liane, will have their Honey Bee Table overflowing with beautiful holiday gifts from Bill's Bees Bee Farm in the Angeles National Forest!
100% Raw Local Honey - Just the Way the Bees Made It!
Homemade Beeswax SoapsLotions and Lip Balms handcrafted by Liane. 
Magical Beeswax Ornaments and 

Beeswax Candles - beautiful, slow burning, crafted on site at Bill's Bees Bee Farm

Enjoy a bowl of Chili!!!   Cornbread!!!  And a Taste of Honey!!!

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Bill's Bees 100% Beeswax Ornaments

Bill's Bees Beeswax Ornaments
Hand Crafted Beeswax Ornaments by Bill's Bees are made at Bill's Bees Bee Farm using 100% Pure Beeswax. We only use beeswax from Bill's Bees honey bees so we know it's natural, 100% pure beeswax - Just the way our bees made it!


Bill's Bees Beeswax XMoose Ornament

The art of crafting and molding beeswax into ornaments is a centuries old German tradition. Bill’s Bees is pleased to continue this treasured tradition and offers you a beautiful selection of 100% pure beeswax ornaments.  

Bill's Bees Beeswax Ornament Angel with Trumpet


Magical on Christmas trees, our beautiful beeswax ornaments can be enjoyed year round hanging in front of a window or on lampshades. They are a wonderful gift to give or receive.

Bill's Bees Beeswax Hanging Angel


As special favors for parties, weddings, showers, special occasions, celebrations, events, hostess gifts, you can make any occasion extra special with a gift from the bees.

Where the bees forage and the nectar they collect determines the color of the wax and the scent of the beeswax. Our honey bees forage in the San Gabriel Mountains of Southern California on a variety of native plants and wildflowers. Bill’s Bees 100% pure beeswax ornaments have a soft golden yellow beeswax color with the pleasant, subtly sweet, aroma of honey.

Bill's Bees 100% Beeswax ornaments are absolutely beautiful. Enjoy!

 

For more information on Bill's Bees 100% Pure Beeswax, please see: 
Produce Info - Beeswax & Candles

You can order online or pick up at one of our local LA Country Farmers markets.

 

 

 

 

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Honey's Not GMO

pure natural honey

Pure natural honey is, by definition, a non-GMO food.  It’s that simple.

By: Michelle Poulk

This message is supported by the American Beekeeping Federation, American Honey Producers Association, National Honey Packer & Dealers Association, Sioux Honey Association and the Western States Packers & Dealers Association.  As a collective group, these organizations represent approximately 95% of the entire United States Honey Industry.

Today’s consumers rely on many sources for information on their diet and food choices. Perhaps the most frequently consulted, but least reliable, source is the internet – where everyone can be an ‘expert’ on their chosen subject.  Gluten-free, raw, local, vegetarian and non-GMO are currently among the food topics most often discussed.

Regarding a non-GMO diet, some of the main questions being asked of the honey industry are:

“Is honey free of GMOs?”

Answer: The FDA discourages the use of the term “GMO Free” because all food items may contain trace amounts of GMOs. The European Union, Australia and other countries have established thresholds for their GMO labeling laws. The regulations require all food items which contain more than 0.9% GMOs to declare GMO contents on the labels. Honey is not required to be identified or labeled as a non-GMO food because GMO’s in honey never exceed this threshold. Honey, as most other foods, may not be completely GMO free, but it is a non-GMO food according to the standards established by the European Union, Australia and other countries.

“I am on a non-GMO diet. Can I eat honey?” 

Answer: Pure honey can be introduced into a non-GMO diet and not only will you maintain your personal nutritional choices, but you will receive all the wonderful benefits honey has to offer.

“If honey is not Certified as non-GMO, does that mean it may contain GMOs?

Answer: Although some interest groups and organizations appear to complicate the issue, the simple truth is this: honey qualifies as a non-GMO food.  It does not require any type of certification in order to be classified as a non-GMO food item.  Some companies choose to have their honey certified as “non-GMO” by independent organizations, but in terms of GMO content, honey certified as non-GMO is not superior to any other non-certified pure honey.

“Can trace GMOs be eliminated from honey by monitoring bee forage areas?”

Answer:  It is not realistically possible to monitor all honey bee forage areas, or to create a GMO-free forage zone. Even if a GMO-free zone were to be established, bees can travel great distances, and neighboring bees could enter the GMO-free zone and distribute pollen containing GMOs onto non-GMO crops.

To better understand the basics of GMOs, here are the FDA definitions on the subject:

“Genetic modification” is defined as the alteration of the genotype of a plant using any technique, new or traditional. “Modification“ refers to the alteration in the composition of food that results from adding, deleting, or changing hereditary traits, irrespective of the method.

This definition is provided by an independent certification organization:

“GMOs (or “genetically modified organisms”) are living organisms whose genetic material has been artificially manipulated in a laboratory through genetic engineering, or GE. This relatively new science creates unstable combinations of plant, animal, bacterial and viral genes that do not occur in nature or through traditional crossbreeding methods.”

So how are these definitions applicable to Honey?

Honey is a food produced by bees from the nectar of plants.  Honey is not a plant and there are no known species of genetically engineered (GE) honey bees.  The definitions support honey’s established status as a non-GMO food item.

Here are just a few of the facts about honey as a non-GMO food:

No genetically modified honey bees exist

Honey is made by bees from the nectar of plants

Honey is not a food that has been artificially manipulated in a laboratory

The amount of pollen in honey ranges from about 0.1% to 0.4%

On average, pollen in honey contains about 0.2% protein.  GMO markers may be found only in the protein

Any trace of GMO’s in honey, therefore, will fall far below the 0.9% threshold established by countries around the world as requiring GMO labeling

In the US, there are no current national GMO labeling requirements.  Moreover, the state of Vermont enacted legislation in 2016, which clearly excludes foods from any GMO labeling requirement when the food is “consisting of or derived entirely from an animal that is itself not produced with genetic engineering, regardless of whether the animal has been fed or injected with any food, drug, or other substance produced with genetic engineering”.

Honey bees, beekeepers and the honey industry are direct contributors to the success of American and world agriculture.  In today’s world, the honey industry faces many problems such as hive loss, drought, colony collapse and shrinking forage areas.  Fortunately, honey’s position as a pure and natural food is unchallenged.

Produced by bees from the nectar of plants, honey is a non-GMO food, the purest of nature’s sweets.

(The above article by Michelle Poulk appeared in Bee Culture - The Magazine of American Beekeeping on August 23, 2016.)

References: 

http://www.honey.com/faq/

http://www.nongmoproject.org/learn-more/

http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm059098.htm

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/news-room/content/20140110IPR32407/html/Parliament-clarifies-labelling-rules-for-honey-if-contaminated-by-GM-pollen

http://www.honey.com/images/uploads/general/Australian_2004_Canola_pollen_study.pdf

http://www.ago.vermont.gov/assets/files/PressReleases/Consumer/Final%20Rule%20CP%20121.pdf

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Beekeeping Class 101 - Class #5: Hive Management and Care of My Honey Bees

Honey bee frameGet ready for Class #5! Join us June 19th (9am-noon) at Bill’s Bees Bee Yard for Class #5 of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association Beekeeping Class 101. (Bee Suits Required)

June bee class is traditionally our class for hunting mites, but every class from now on out will have a segment on testing for mites, monitoring mite levels, and safe mite treatments for honey bees.

We will continue to follow the progress of packages installed in May.

With good mentoring, monitoring, and continued learning of beekeeping skills, you're off to a good start. Enjoy!

Happy Bee-ing!
Bill & Clyde
Bill's Bees

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Beekeeping Class 101 - Class #4: Hive Management

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - Class #4

Get ready for Class #4! Join us Sunday, May 15th (9am-noon) at Bill's Bees Bee Yard for Class #4 of the 2016 Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association Beekeeping Class 101 series (Bee Suits Required). 

In this hand’s on beekeeping class you’re going to learn about hive management and what to look for to see how your bees are doing: 

  • Is my queen healthy? Or, am I queenless? 
  • Is there brood? Or, do I need to replace my queen?
  • Is there food? Or, do I need to feed my bees? What? When? How?
  • Are there Varroa mites? And if so, what do I do? 

For those of you who attended Class #3, we took our first peek inside the hive and had a look around:

We learned to approach a bee hive from the side, slowly and with care, and that it’s not a good idea to stand in front of the hive, blocking the entrance. Foragers, packed with nectar and pollen, were anxious to get in.

A few puffs of smoke from the smoker helped calm the bees before we opened the top cover. Once the cover was removed, we began our inspection inside the hive. As we removed the frames we leaned them against the side of the box. 
We worked from the outside frames first then moved toward the inside. While carefully removing the frames, we looked for the queen. She's larger and moves quicker than the worker bees and is usually going from cell to cell laying eggs. We finally found the queen surrounded by her 'court,' healthy and happy, and busy laying eggs.  

We saw where the worker bees had started building wax on new frames and were forming the wax into cells. Honey bee cells are the same size all over the world. Worker bee cells are the smallest cells, flat topped, capped with wax. This is called capped brood. Drone cells are bigger, taller, with a dome top. Queen cells are large, peanut shape and texture.

We learned that a beehive consists of three types of bees: Females: 1 Queen, Thousands of Worker Bees. Males: Drones. These three types of individual bees make up the collective hive which is an organization in itself. 

It was an amazing first look inside a bee hive; lot's of oooh's and aaah's, and finger's pointing: What's this? What's that? What are they doing?

Now, in Class #4, we’re going to go more in depth, and learn to recognize the signs of a healthy or troubled hive:

First, we’re going to find the queen and determine if she’s still laying eggs. If she’s not laying, she may be a dud, and we might need to replace her. And, how do we replace a queen?

Then, we’ll look for eggs and see if the larvae have been fed royal jelly. Worker bees feed royal jelly (a milky white substance) to larvae for the first three days. After three days, the worker bees feed the larvae pollen (bee bread). They will continue to feed pollen to the larvae until the larvae is capped off; usually around the 14th or 15th day. Worker bees emerge about 21 days after the egg is laid, drones 24 days, and a queen will emerge about 16 days after the egg is laid. We’re going to learn to identify the differing stages of larvae, locate the capped brood, and learn what the brood pattern reveals to us about the health of the brood and the hive. We'll also learn to tell the difference between capped brood and capped honey.

We'll cover what bees eat:

  • Why do bees need pollen: It is their protein. If bees are not bringing in enough pollen, you’ll learn to determine if you need to feed them a pollen substitute.
  • Why do bees need nectar: It is their carbohydrates. If the bees are not bringing in enough nectar, you may need to feed them sugar syrup. You'll learn how.

We’ll talk about Varroa mites. They seem to be out way too early this season. We’ll discuss various ways of testing for mites and what to do if your bees are infested.

Now, if you really want to get excited and get a jump on identifying the stages of larvae, check out this amazing time lapse video from National Geographic. Honeybee Metamorphosis: From tiny eggs to quivering pupae to hair-sprouting adults, worker honeybees develop at lightning speed thanks to a time-lapse video of 2,500 images. http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/magazine/150415-ngm-bees-more.

Honeybee Metamorphosis - National Geographic

With good mentoring, monitoring, and continued learning of beekeeping skills, your bees are off to a good start. Enjoy!

Happy Bee-ing!
Bill & Clyde
Bill’s Bees

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